Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://has.hcu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/1619
Title: Malaria and Enterobiasis among Karen Long-Neck Tribe in Mae Hong Son Province
Authors: Choosak Nithikathkul
Panida Polseela
Wilawan Poodendan
Marc Brodsky
Derek Rakprapapant
Suparp Chadchatreechan
Aree Phethleart
Yaowalark Sukthana
Somjai Leemingsawat
Huachiew Chalermprakiet University. Faculty of Science and Technology. Department of Biological Science
Naresuan University. Faculty of Basic Medical Science. Department of Microbiology and Parasitology.
Naresuan University. Faculty of Basic Medical Science. Department of Microbiology and Parasitology.
United States Naval Hospital
Huachiew Chalermprakiet University. Faculty of Science and Technology. Department of Mathematics and Statistics
Vector-borne Disease Control Unit No.8
London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases
Huachiew Chalermprakiet University. Huachiew Chalermprakiet University. Department of Protozoology
Mahidol University. Faculty of Tropical Medicine. Department of Medical Entomology
Keywords: Malaria -- Thailand -- Mae Hong Son
มาลาเรีย -- ไทย -- แม่ฮ่องสอน
โรคพยาธิเส้นด้ายในเด็ก
Enterobius
กะเหรี่ยง -- ไทย -- แม่ฮ่องสอน
Karen (Southeast Asian people) -- Thailand -- Mae Hong Son
Issue Date: 2003
Citation: Southeast Asian J. Trop. Med. Public Health 34 (Suppl 2) 2003 : 25-28
Abstract: In Thailand, Mae Hong Son Province is highly endemic for malaria. Knowing this, the local Health Department has introduced a program to educate local residents about the risk factors, in particular the dangers and symptoms of malaria. This study was conducted to evaluate these efforts, by determining the number of malaria infections in a segment of the population, and also by testing for enterobiasis among a group of its children. Two villages in Mae Hong Son Province were chosen for this purpose with a combined population of about 300. Of these, 195 were screened for malaria. Two subjects were diagnosed positive for malaria by microscopy. One of these two villages was chosen to screen for Enterobius vermicularis infection in children as well. Out of 69 stool samples, five (7%) showed infection with E. vermicularis: three with a low number of eggs (1-50), and two with a high number of eggs (>100). Compared with infection rates in similar studies, the results of this study indicate that the Health Department's efforts are meeting with relative success. The low prevalence of infection indicates that the villagers are using the information they have received to help combat infection.
Description: เข้าถึงบทความฉบับเต็มได้ที่ https://www.tm.mahidol.ac.th/seameo/2003-34-suppl-2/05-025.pdf
URI: https://has.hcu.ac.th/jspui/handle/123456789/1619
ISSN: 0125-1562
Appears in Collections:Science and Technology - Artical Journals

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